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UDK Basics Getting Started in 11 Steps Part 2/3

Category: UDK
June 22, 2010

UDK Basics

UDK Basics covers the most essential tools and functions you need to know to get started with UDK. You'll be able to quickly jump into UDK and begin feeling comfortable using the most commonly used functions. UDK beginner tutorials.

UDK Basics Getting Started in 11 Steps Part 1/3

UDK Basics Getting Started in 11 Steps Part 2/3

UDK Basics Getting Started in 11 Steps Part 3/3

Note: UDK March 2010 was used in this tutorial. Some functions have changed, but the general ideas of the tutorial still apply. Principles are the same.

In UDK Basics Part 2/3 you'll learn:

  • Navigating around UDK. 3 most common ways to navigate, including WASD key navigation.
  • Basics of Static Mesh usage and BSP Brushes.
  • Additive vs Subtractive. Which one to use and what is the difference.

6. NAVIGATION

UDK:

  • Left Mouse Button (LMB): Pan. Right/Left/Forward/Back Movements
  • Right Mouse Button (RMB): Rotate, Look Around
  • LMB+RMB: Up/Down

WASD NAVIGATION:

  • Click and Hold Right Mouse Button. As you hold RMB use the W A S D keyboard keys to move around as you would playing a First Person Shooter game.
  • W A S D movement is great if you are familiar with Hammer Source mapping.

MAYA USERS

  • Hold down U key
  • U+ LMB: rotate, look around
  • U+ RMB: Forward/Back Movements
  • U+ MMB: Right/Left/Up/Down Movements

7. USING BSP BRUSHES AND STATIC MESHES

Red Builder Brush creates BSP brushes. The Red Builder Brush acts as a template for creating BSP geometry. The Red Builder Brush does not show up in game.

UDK Basics

Hammer Source Engine still uses BSP operation to construct the main shell of the level, but majority of next-gen engines heavily rely on static meshes. Static Meshes is what you will be using to primarily define how your map looks in UDK. Static meshes are the models that make up the 90% of your level. Creating static meshes requires you to have a 3d application such as XSI, Maya or 3dsMax etc.

  • Red Builder Brush is what you will use to create BSP brushes.
  • Static Meshes is what you'll be using to detail the environment.

Why use BSP?

BSP is a great tool to block in your map with. BSP is often used to quickly create playable space and test.

Can I use Static Meshes to create my map without using BSP?
Yes. Although, you will need a 3d software application that supports UDK's plugin, such as AutoDesk Maya, 3DsMax, XSI.

UDK CSG Operations for Brushes include:

  • CSG Add
  • CSG Subtract
  • CSG Intersect
  • CSG Deintersect

UDK Basics

DOMINANCE OF STATIC MESHES

Static Meshes are simply the models in your level. If you open up any UDK map, 90% of the map will be static meshes and the rest will be BSP brushes.

Brushes only. No Static Meshes:
UDK Basics

Brushes and Static Meshes:
UDK Basics

8. ADDITIVE VS SUBTRACTIVE

When you create a new map by going to File --> New, you are presented with two options to create a map inside UDK. Additive and Subtractive. Most common and most used is Additive mode.

UDK Basics

Additive: Think of empty space, here you would be adding walls, models and the environment assets into the empty space. Real life example of constructing a building wall by wall would be additive map creation.

Subtractive: Think of a solid rock. Subtractive method you would be cutting the rooms and environment out of this solid mass. Subtracting the solid rock, in order to have room. It's like sculpting.

UDK Basics Getting Started in 11 Steps Part 1/3

UDK Basics Getting Started in 11 Steps Part 2/3

UDK Basics Getting Started in 11 Steps Part 3/3

Note: UDK March 2010 was used in this tutorial. Some functions have changed, but the general ideas of the tutorial still apply. Principles are the same.

Preproduction Blueprint - How to Plan Your Game Environments and Level Designs

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